Late Golden Hour

When the golden hour doesn't start until close to 10 pm, it's tough to stick to an early to bed/early to rise schedule. Try as might I just can't pass up evening light like this, so I will soak it up while it lasts and six months from now when we are in perpetual winter shade, I'll be glad I did.

Have a great weekend. The forecast calls for ample light and beautiful opportunities!

Colin


Alaska Wild Rose

Alaska Wild Rose


Greater yellowlegs perched in a spruce tree.

Greater yellowlegs perched in a spruce tree.

Moose Monday

Hello everyone. It's Moose Monday!

This guy has been making a splash in local ponds recently. He is one of at least 3 bulls that I've seen in the area in the past few weeks. As their diet changes in the spring, so does the shape and consistency of their droppings and for this reason, is often mistaken for bear scat, which there is also an abundance of right now.

Colin


_CTB1185.jpg

Summer Digital Photography Class

Hello everyone! Just a quick shoutout before the weekend to announce that I am offering a beginning digital photography class at the Eagle River Nature Center on Sunday, July 21 from 9 am to 5 pm. Cost is $75 and limited to ten people. If you or anyone you know would like to learn more about nature photography while gaining a better understanding of digital cameras and shooting in manual mode, please follow the link below to register. One person has already signed up and I anticipate that this will fill quickly, so don't hesitate!

Thank you and have a fantastic weekend!

Colin

https://www.ernc.org/courses/digital-photography-workshop


Empty Nesting

Look 'hoo' is out of the nest! When I visited this great horned owl family previously, this juvenile was still in the nest while its sibling had ventured out to a nearby branch. Now they are both out of the nest and will not return. Young may leave the nest as early as 5 weeks old by hopping onto branches and begin flying at 9-10 weeks of age.

Seeing as how this is graduation season, are there any human parents out there experiencing empty nest feelings??

Hope everyone had a great holiday weekend and thank you for following along!

✌️🦉 Colin


_CTB0934.jpg


Saw-Whet! Say What??

"I saw it!"

"Saw what?"

"A saw-whet!"

"Say what???"

That's right, I saw it! The northern saw-whet owl. At 7-8 inches in height and weighing less then 4 ounces, it is one of the smallest owls in North America and we are on the northern edge of its range here in Southcentral Alaska. In fact, saw-whets just started showing up in this area within the past 10 years. They are elusive little creatures and mostly nocturnal.

Have a great Memorial Day out there and enjoy this last day of the holiday weekend!

Colin


_CTB0916.jpg

More Moose on the Road...

Following up on my post from two days ago regarding moose on the roadways, this morning was another reminder when a cow with two newborn calves were trying to cross the Eagle River Road. The calves either weren't able or weren't willing to make it over the guardrail, so mom kept going back to try convince them to follow her. Cars were stopped for several minutes in both directions until two vehicles pushed ahead, forcing the cow to step back over the guardrail to be with her calves, only to return to the road after they passed.

Before I left she had stepped off the road to be closer to her calves, so I was able to pass by without causing them to retreat. I understand being in a hurry, but unless it's an emergency, please allow wildlife to safely cross the roadways, especially the newborns.

Thank you and have a great weekend!

Colin


_CTB0660.jpg

_CTB0717.jpg

_CTB0736.jpg

"Give 'em a Brake"

"Give moose a 'brake'" is the slogan we're accustomed to seeing on Alaska highways. Rounding a curve and meeting one of these giants could end poorly for both parties, and they do not always yield the right of way. 

Just a reminder on this Wednesday to watch for moose, and all wildlife, that we often share the roads with. 

✌️

Colin


_CTB0526.jpg

New Life in the Valley

Spring is in full swing here in Eagle River Valley and new life it popping up all around! I passed by this nesting great horned owlet this morning. One of the adults was perched nearby and I could hear its mate in the vicinity as well.

Have a great weekend and thank you for following along!

Colin

Image taken with the Nikon D850.


_CTB0300.jpg

Earth Day Solitude

Yesterday's theme was solitude. I spent the entire day hiking in Eagle River Valley without another soul around. Snow fell throughout the day, adding to my peaceful surroundings. Pictured here is Dew Lake, where I stopped on my way to search for another lake a few miles further back and across the river. I found the hidden lake, or Knob Lake, as it's named on local maps. It's a location I will revisit when the time is right, or if I just need a bit of solitude.

Colin


_CTB0156.jpg

Earth Day 2019

Happy Earth Day 2019! This day will always remain significant to me for many reasons: https://www.colintyler.com/news/2015/4/22/from-ashes-to-adventure-one-year-in-this-big-giant-life?rq=from%20ashes%20to%20ad
In keeping with tradition on this date, I am off to explore a location that is new to me and thankfully the rain has turned to snow for my day hike excursion. I took this image last year on Earth Day in Hatcher Pass, Alaska. Exactly one month later it made the Daily Dozen at National Geographic Yourshot.

Colin


_CTB5180.jpg



Feather Detail

After photographing this pair of swans in the same small body of water for five consecutive springs, it can be difficult to come up with new and interesting compositions. In this instance, I decided to let go of the big picture and just appreciate the exquisite detail in the feathers.

Have a great day out there and maybe try look at a familiar scene from a new perspective...

Colin


_CTB2073.jpg



Farewell, Swans...

Fun Friday Fact: More than half of North American trumpeter swans breed in Alaska, Northern British Columbia, and the Yukon Territory during summer months. It appears that this pair has left the Nature Center and moved on toward their summer nesting grounds. Typically they stay here from 2-4 weeks and I have to assume it is the same pair that returns each spring. They're always a welcome sight and I look forward to their return next year.

Have a great weekend out there!

Colin


Bathing and preening shortly after their arrival two weeks ago.

Bathing and preening shortly after their arrival two weeks ago.